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Minimizing The Risk of Childhood Food Allergies

Dr. Eric Viegas, ND

Ottawa Holistic Wellness Centre

www.medicineismusic.ca

food allergies child peanut

Q: As a parent of a young child, what steps can I take to reduce the risk of childhood food allergies?

A:

  • Fish Oil consumption during pregnancy may cut the risk of childhood allergies by 30% (1). Researchers in London compiled data from women consuming a daily fish oil capsule from the 20th week of pregnancy until the first 3-4 months of breastfeeding. The consumption of fish oil cut the risk of childhood egg allergy by 30% (1).

 

fish oil food allergies child

 

  • Probiotics: eczema risk was cut by 22% in a group of mothers consuming a daily probiotic supplement between 36-38 weeks of pregnancy and the first 3-6 months of breastfeeding (1). However, probiotic supplementation did not appear to reduce the risk of childhood dairy allergy (1).

 

soap baby food allergies bath

 

  • Hygiene: Avoid overuse of “baby wipes” and make sure that soap is completely washed off of your baby’s skin. A recent study using mice suggests that disruption of our skin’s top lipid (fat) layer by soaps and allergens can contribute to the development of food allergies in young children with altered genetic mutations in their skin (2). Mice with genetic mutations in their skin barrier that were exposed to common food allergens (eg. peanuts) to their skin over 2 weeks were then fed these allergens by mouth. The mice developed allergic reactions in the intestines, on the exposed skin sites, and suffered anaphylaxis. More research is needed in this area to further clarify how these mechanisms affect humans. Unfortunately, skin barrier mutations are not visible in children until later in life, so minimizing your child’s exposure to harsh chemicals and allergens that may disrupt their skin barrier is a factor in reducing the risk of developing childhood food allergies.

 

 

Always consult with your doctor before beginning any new supplement or medication. For more information on the prevention and treatment of childhood allergies, consult with your local naturopathic doctor and/or functional medicine practitioner.

 

References:

 

  1. Garcia-Larsen V, Ierodiakonou D, Jarrold K, Cunha S, Chivinge J, et al. (2018) Diet during pregnancy and infancy and risk of allergic or autoimmune disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. PLOS Medicine 15(2): e1002507. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507.
  2. Matthew T. Walker, Jeremy E. Green, Ryan P. Ferrie, Ashley M. Queener, Mark H. Kaplan, Joan M. Cook-Mills. Mechanism for initiation of food allergy: dependence on skin barrier mutations and environmental allergen costimulation. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2018, ISSN 0091-6749, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2018.02.003.

Herbal Medicine for Anxiety and Depression: New Evidence

Dr. Eric Viegas, ND

March 2018

depression anxiety herbal medicine naturopath ottawa

 

Depression is estimated to affect 5.4% of Canadians aged 15+ (1).  1 in 8 adults will meet the criteria for a mood disorder in their lifetime (1). Women have higher rates of depression than men.

 

Anxiety can also be present with a diagnosis of depression, further impacting a person’s quality of life.

 

People living with depression experience a lack of pleasure in activities that once brought them joy, sleep issues, fatigue, guilt and feelings of worthlessness, memory and concentration issues, and thoughts of suicide.

 

Depression and anxiety also contribute to a high burden of stress in people with cancer.

 

In a survey of 3370 cancer survivors, 20% identified with moderate to severe levels of depression, and 40% were living with moderate to severe anxiety lasting 6 years after diagnosis (2).

 

Due to the large number of adverse effects, and interactions with chemotherapeutics, conventional antidepressant and anti-anxiety medications are not favourable for cancer people (3). It’s no surprise then that this population seems to favour herbal remedies for anxiety and depression.

 

A recent systematic review summarized the evidence from 100 single herb clinical trials for depression and anxiety from 1996-2016 (4).

 

Here are the top herbal remedies for anxiety and depression as identified by this study:

 

Lavender

A fragrant and relaxing plant to grow in your garden, lavender is also used in perfumes and aromatherapy products. Lavender extracts, taken orally, show a stronger anti-anxiety effect than placebo and are comparable in effect to prescription drugs (eg. paroxetine, lorazepam) in human trials. Lavender also has fewer adverse effects than these drugs.

lavender anxiety depression naturopath ottawa

A tea made from lavender buds may improve the effect of citalopram; a commonly prescribed antidepressant medication.

 

Passionflower

Used by Native Americans as a remedy to improve sleep and anxiety, passionflower tea may improve sleep quality. When used with clonidine, passionflower extract was also shown to improve mental-emotional well-being for people undergoing opioid withdrawal.

passionflower depression anxiety sleep naturopath ottawa

Compared to the anti-anxiety medications oxazepam and sertraline, passionflower extract was not more effective in reducing severity of symptoms, but it had much fewer adverse effects.

 

Saffron

A commonly used spice in South Asia and the Middle East.

saffron depression anxiety premenstrual naturopath ottawa

Saffron was found to be most beneficial for people that identified with mild to moderate anxiety. Some studies also showed that saffron was superior to standard antidepressant drugs (fluoxetine and imipramine).

 

Women who have a flare-up of anxiety and/or depression premenstrually also benefited from saffron extract.

Black Cohosh

Commonly found in most herbal preparations for menopausal symptoms, black cohosh may have a positive effect on hot flashes.

black cohosh depression anxiety hormones naturopath ottawa

One study using a patented extract called Remifemin® was shown to be as effective as low dose topical estrogen in reducing hot flashes, anxiety, and depression without the adverse effects of hormone therapy.

Chamomile

Popular in sleep teas, chamomile is an effective anti-anxiety herb for people dealing with mild to moderate anxiety.

chamomile anxiety depression naturopath ottawa

Chamomile was also shown to be effective in the long-term (the study looked at 38 weeks of treatment) but had no effect on relapse rates.

 

Chaste Tree

Another herbal remedy for hormonal issues, chaste tree/vitex is often taken for premenstrual and fertility issues.

chaste tree vitex anxiety depression fertility naturopath ottawa

Chaste tree, when compared to the antidepressant fluoxetine, was shown to be more effective in reducing physical symptoms associated with depression in postmenopausal women.

 

Always check with your doctor before starting any nutritional supplement, herb, or medication.

 

Follow the links for additional information on anxiety, insomnia, and fatigue.

 

References

 

  1. Pearson, Caryn, Teresa Janz and Jennifer Ali. 2013. “Mental and substance use disorders in Canada” Health at a Glance. September. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 82-624-X.
  2. Inhestern, L., Beierlein, V., Bultmann, J. C., Moller, B., Romer, G., Koch, U., & Bergelt, C. (2017). Anxiety and depression in working‐age cancer survivors: A register‐based study. BMC Cancer, 17(1), 347.
  3. Fajemiroye, J. O., da Silva, D. M., de Oliveira, D. R., & Costa, E. A. (2016). Treatment of anxiety and depression: Medicinal plants in retrospect. Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology, 30(3), 198–215.
  4. Yeung, K., et al. Herbal medicine for depression and anxiety: a systematic review with assessment of potential psycho-oncologic relevance (2018). Phytotherapy Research, 1-27.

10 Common Childhood Rashes and What You Should Know About Them

Dr. Eric Viegas, ND

rash child ottawa naturopath

There are many different types of rashes that children and their parents will encounter throughout their lives.

The following is a list of common rashes, their causes and symptoms, a description of their appearance, and what you can do about them.

 

 

  • Contact Dermatitis

 

Many causes including certain foods, body products, latex, jewelry and poison ivy.

 

Most incidents of contact dermatitis are mild, start around 48 hours after skin exposure, and resolve when the specific substance is prevented from contacting the skin. A mild reaction will usually result in small red bumps, while a more serious reaction can result in swelling and blisters.

 

  • Measles

 

A red, but not itchy, viral rash that is located over most of the child’s body. Children will usually complain of common cold symptoms: fever, sneezing, irritated throat, coughing, swollen glands, red eyes, and loss of appetite. Although preventable with the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine, those who choose to forego immunization are at a higher risk of infection. If you believe your child has been infected with measles, please seek medical care immediately.

 

 

  • Scarlet Fever

 

Most common in children ages 2-10 (but infection can occur at any age). A scarlet fever rash is coarse to the touch, and red. It typically presents on the torso first, then spreads to other areas of the body over the course of a couple of days.

 

Children will typically present with a high fever followed by the rash 24 hours later.

Other symptoms include sore throat, difficulty swallowing, and white or yellow spots at the back of the throat; all related to a strep throat infection. If you suspect that your child has scarlet fever, seek medical attention immediately.

 

 

  • Chickenpox

 

Caused by the varicella zoster virus, this is a contagious and very itchy rash that affects the whole body. It may appear as red spots and/or blisters (pox). Each chickenpox red spot has a life cycle of 1-2 days; blistering, bursting, drying out, and crusting. New spots will appear daily for up to one week. This infection will stay dormant in nerves, and may result in an outbreak of shingles later in life.

 

An easy way to combat the itchiness of chickenpox is an oatmeal bath:

  • Using a mesh bag or cheesecloth, add 1 cup of uncooked oats and tie off one end.
  • Secure the oatmeal bag under your tub’s faucet and run under warm water, periodically squeezing the bag as the tub fills.
  • Once the bath is full, you can remove the bag from the faucet, letting it float in the bathwater. Continue to periodically squeeze the bag into the water.
  • Submerge affected areas in the bath for 20 mins.
  • You can also add calendula and lavender flowers to help soothe irritated skin.

 

 

  • Roseola

 

Appears around 3 days after a high fever caused by the roseola virus. This infection is usually mild, starting with a sudden high fever for 2-3 days and developing into a pink rash appearing on the torso, neck and arms once the fever begins to drop. Some children may experience seizures due to the sudden intensity of the fever, and the rash will last 1-2 days. This rash typically affects children aged 6 months to 2 years. Seek medical care if you suspect your child has roseola.

 

 

  • Fifth Disease

 

A “slapped cheek” facial rash that also has a lacy appearance on the torso, arms, legs, and buttocks.

This rash will follow sudden flu-like symptoms (fever, fatigue, aches, etc.), and children are most contagious 7 days before the onset of the rash.

 

Once the rash has appeared, children are no longer contagious. Hot temperatures and sunlight exposure may cause the rash to wax and wane over several weeks.

 

While the infection is mild for children, developing fetuses are at an increased risk when exposed to fifth disease. If you are pregnant and develop some of the signs and symptoms of fifth disease, seek medical attention immediately.

 

 

  • Heat Rash

 

Can happen to any baby exposed to hot weather or dressed too warmly. The rash looks like red or pink dots on the child’s head, neck, and/or shoulders.

Make sure your child is dressed lightly on hot days, covering their head and limbs, and do your best to avoid prolonged sun exposure.

 

 

  • Cradle Cap

 

Oily, yellow, scaly and/or crusting rash on a baby’s scalp. This rash is common and treatable, and its presence certainly does not mean parents are not caring for their baby.

Home treatment for cradle cap:

  • An hour before shampooing, rub your baby’s scalp with baby oil, or vaseline to help lift and loosen the crusts/ scales.
  • Wet your baby’s scalp then gently scrub the scalp with a soft-bristle brush (eg. a soft toothbrush or a fine-toothed comb) for a few minutes to remove the scales.
  • Wash the scalp with baby shampoo, rinse well, and gently towel dry.

 

 

  • Lyme Disease

 

Can be caused by bacteria that are carried by ticks. A Bullseye red rash at the site of the bite will expand, followed by flu-like symptoms, joint pain, and neurological problems.

 

In the case of lyme disease, see a doctor immediately.

 

 

  • Diaper Rash

 

Can be caused by urine/stool bacteria, moisture, heat, friction, or chemicals in a baby’s diaper. The rash has a red (may also appear burned/scalded) appearance, and affects the thighs, buttocks, genitals, or abdomen.

Sometimes, a yeast infection may be responsible for the rash, so always check with your doctor before using any medicated ointments for your child.

 

As with any skin issue, it is best to see your doctor when a rash presents so that you can get an accurate diagnosis and timely treatment. Some rashes require immediate antibiotics, while others tend to resolve on their own. I hope this quick guide to rashes will help ease the stress around skin issues for you and your children.

Male Fertility: Some Background Info

Dr. Eric Viegas, ND

@medicineismusic

www.medicineismusic.ca

 

The term infertility has no agreed upon standard meaning. Generally, if a couple has not conceived after 1 year of sexual intercourse they are labelled as infertile.

 

About 16% of Canadian couples fall into this territory of infertility; a figure that has doubled since the 80s.(1)

 

In about 3 out of every 10 cases, male fertility issues are the sole causative factor in a couples’ fertility problems.

male fertility dr. eric viegas naturopath ottawa

Some factors at play here include: poor sperm quality, low sperm count, sexually transmitted infections, chronic illnesses (eg. diabetes), smoking (both tobacco and marijuana), alcohol, and poor weight control (overweight or underweight).

 

Recently, an article published in TIME magazine highlighted a study on the long-term use of ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin). Researchers found that, after 6 weeks, men taking daily ibuprofen experienced “compensatory hypogonadism” suggestive of male fertility problems.

male fertility dr. eric viegas naturopath ottawa

Basically, increasing ibuprofen levels in the blood also saw a rise in the body’s production of luteinizing hormone (LH). LH functions as a signal for the production of testosterone in the testicles. However, study participants did not see a rise in testosterone production despite LH levels being high.(2)

 

When researchers studied the effects of ibuprofen on testicular function, they found the cells responsible for testosterone production (those that respond to LH) were suppressed.(2)

 

Another possible reason for male infertility is mitochondrial dysfunction.(3)

male fertility dr. eric viegas naturopath ottawa

Mitochondria are the powerhouses or batteries of our cells, and sperm is no different. Mitochondrial DNA mutations that result in poorly functioning mitochondria have been identified in males with fertility concerns.

 

Fortunately, there are diet and lifestyle interventions that show promise in their ability to increase the number of healthy mitochondria, boost sperm function, and help cope with the stress of fertility problems.

 

Speak with your Naturopathic Doctor for more information on how fertility issues can be effectively treated with a holistic approach to wellness.

 

References:

 

  1. Government of Canada. Fertility. Feb 4, 2013. https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/fertility/fertility.html accessed Jan 15, 2018.
  2. Kristensen DM, et al.Ibuprofen alters human testicular physiology to produce a state of compensated hypogonadism. PNAS Jan 2018; doi: 10.1073/pnas.1715035115.
  3. Nakada K., et al. Mitochondria-related male infertility. PNAS 2006; 103(41): 15148-15153.

 

Mindset and Holistic Health

Mindset and Holistic Health: What’s serving you, and what isn’t?

Dr. Eric Viegas, ND

 

mindset dr. eric viegas naturopath ottawa

I often have people with chronic illnesses approach me for treatment. Sometimes, they do quite well with just minor lifestyle and nutritional changes. These treatments can be thought of as addressing an underlying, physical, cause.

 

However, I have also treated cases that require healing of a deeper underlying cause.

 

Our minds and bodies are very closely connected to one another, and their influence on each other should not be overlooked.

 

There are numerous clinical studies emphasizing the importance of diet, exercise, and stress management when it comes to a healthy mood balance, but what about the other way around?

 

What about your mindset? What do you focus on in your attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours?

 

Can the connection between your physical health and your mindset (that is, your emotional health) be the underlying cause of your distress?

 

A good example of this is insomnia.

insomnia mindset dr. eric viegas naturopath ottawa

Chronic insomnia is a common problem for many Canadians. Since supplements are easy to get over the counter, I find most people self-prescribe remedies to help themselves sleep. In some cases, the self-prescription may work, but it will not deal directly with the underlying cause of insomnia if you don’t do the work of asking “why?”.

 

When you are trying to fall asleep how do you feel? Anxious? Frustrated? Scared?

 

Your individual emotional response to your insomnia is an important factor in assessing and treating it.

 

Taking a melatonin supplement recommended by a supplement store employee for insomnia may initially help you, but it does not address your underlying emotional health and mindset.

 

What makes you feel anxious? How long have you felt this way? Has the feeling changed with time? In what other areas of your life do you find yourself feeling that way? I often ask questions of this nature to understand a person as a whole being; what makes them who they are and how do they react to their stress on the physical, mental-emotional, and spiritual planes?

 

Asking non-directional questions, either with the help of a health professional or on your own, will help you to reframe your perceptions. When we take a step back from our habitual behaviours, attitudes, and beliefs we have the opportunity to foster a deeper understanding of why it is we do what we do.

 

Ultimately, the question of  “do these beliefs/emotions/thoughts serve you?” will arise, and it is not an easy question to answer.

 

Perhaps your anxiety is helpful when it comes to meeting deadlines at work. But, if you cannot recover from a stressful day with a healthy sleep because your anxiety is keeping you awake, then your mindset is not serving you as a whole person.

 

I am not a fan of New Year’s resolutions. In 2018, instead of making a New Year’s resolution, think about your emotional health. Ask yourself “what makes me feel this way?” and explore the inner workings of your mindset.

 

Bolster Your Immune System for The Holiday Season

Q&A: How Will My Immune System Survive The Holidays?

 

With winter and family holidays fast approaching, I am constantly asked about what can be done to bolster the immune system and reduce stress. Here are some easy tips to get you through the rest of the year.

 

Q: I’m travelling a lot over the holidays, what can I do to boost my immune system?

 

A: A recent study used elderberry to prevent the onset of influenza during air travel. The study looked at 600-900 mg of elderberry extract containing 90-135mg of anthocyanins. Study participants took 2 capsules per day for 10 days before air travel. Two to four days before departure, the dosage was increased to 3 capsules per day, until 4 days after arrival at their destination (1).

immune system dr. eric viegas

Anthocyanins belong to the flavonoid group of phytochemicals; commonly found in teas, wine, fruits, vegetables, nuts, olive oil, and cocoa. They add vibrant color to these foods, along with a potent antioxidant capacity. Recent research into the human effects of anthocyanins has revealed their ability to strengthen blood vessels, balance the immune system, and combat inflammation (2,3).

 

Of the 312 participants taking the elderberry extract, 29 developed a cold. The group taking the placebo treatment had greater symptom severity and over twice the duration of illness compared to the elderberry group.

 

For more information on how you can best avoid the cold and flu this year, click here

Q: I’ve heard sugar can compromise my immune system. What lifestyle behaviours can help me with my sweet tooth?

 

A: Sugar is a contributing factor when dealing with illness over the holidays. Try structuring your meals with a low carbohydrate content, and increase your consumption of proteins from meat and vegetable sources. Some good vegan sources of protein include pumpkin seeds, lentils, black beans, almonds, and tempeh.

healty immune system dr. eric viegas

Munching on high protein snacks will help to keep your blood sugar stable, increase feelings of fullness, and make it less likely for you to grab extra holiday treats.

 

Q:What about stress and my immune system? My family drives me crazy over the holidays, and I know I’m going to get sick because of the added stress…

 

A: Stress is an inevitable part of everyone’s lives. Unfortunately, you can’t pick your family, but you can build your resilience to the added stress that comes with holiday get togethers.

 

Daily yoga is an excellent way to tone your nervous system and help you keep a cool head when dealing with added stress.

healthy immune system dr. eric viegas

A recent systematic review of 11 studies found that yoga enhanced the production of the body’s own antioxidants vitamin C and glutathione in healthy, diabetic, prediabetic, hypertensive, and renal disease patients. As a result, there was a significant reduction of oxidative stress after a session of yoga (4).

 

The great thing about yoga is that you don’t need to go to a class to reap the health benefits. A quick search of youtube will get thousands of results for many different types of yoga; one for every person’s unique needs.

 

Have a safe and happy holiday!

 

References:

 

  1. Tiralongo E, Wee SS, Lea RA. Elderberry supplementation reduces cold duration and symptoms in air-travelers: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Nutrients. 2016;8(4):182.
  2. Lila, Mary Ann. “Anthocyanins and Human Health: An In Vitro Investigative Approach.” Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology 2004.5 (2004): 306–313. PMC. Web. 2 Nov. 2017.
  3. Youdim K, Martin A, Joseph J. Incorporation of the elderberry anthocyanins by endothelial cells increases protection against oxidative stress. Free Radic Biol Med. 2000;29(1):51–60.
  4. Pal, R. & Gupta, N. (2017). Yogic practices on oxidative stress and of antioxidant level: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine, 0(0), pp. -. Retrieved 2 Nov. 2017, from doi:10.1515/jcim-2017-0079.

Eczema FAQs & How Naturopathic Medicine can help

eczema dr eric viegas

Dr. Eric Viegas, ND

 

Why do I have Eczema?

  • Partly due to genetics, immune dysregulation causing allergic inflammation, and environmental factors.
  • If you have a family history of eczema you are more likely to develop it. Environmental factors like bacterial (staphylococcus aureus) colonization of damaged skin, and chronic phthalate exposure (found in textiles, food products, and plastics) contribute to inflammation and immune dysregulation.
  • There is some evidence that the presence of helicobacter pylori, a bacteria commonly known for causing stomach ulcers, can also contribute to immune dysregulation and inflammation of the skin barrier.
  • Food triggers are also an important contributor to eczema. Increased intestinal permeability contributes to allergen sensitization, so chances are good that your digestive system needs some help. A naturopathic doctor can work with you to establish which foods may be contributing to your eczema.
  • If you have endocrine problems like thyroid disease it is best to take your medication and be well managed, as worsening hypothyroidism may also worsen the severity of your eczema.

 

What is the best treatment for Eczema?

  • A combination of dietary management, skin care, and stress management will help to control the chronic symptoms of eczema and address the underlying causes.

 

Can diet affect Eczema?

  • Eggs, wheat, dairy, soy, peanuts, tomatoes, and artificial colours & preservatives have been implicated as triggers in a large percentage of eczema cases. Elimination of these offending foods has been shown to restore normal intestinal function and reduce the progression of new food allergies. Avoidance of these foods may be continued for up to one year to achieve the best results.
  • There is also a growing body of evidence to support histamine intolerance in the development and severity of eczema. In histamine intolerance, ingestion of histamine-rich foods (think red wine, aged cheeses, cured meats) overwhelms your gut’s ability to breakdown this inflammatory molecule. Overtime, more systemic signs of histamine intolerance (rashes, heart palpitations, irritable bowel syndrome, and allergies) develop.
  • Eating more fatty fish (eg. salmon, herring) in pregnancy, lactation, infancy and childhood has shown protective effects against eczema in epidemiologic studies.

 

What lifestyle behaviours can help with my eczema?

  • First, stop scratching. Scratching will break the skin barrier and allow for bacterial colonization.
  • In terms of keeping clean, baths are more beneficial than showers as long as you remember to “soak and smear”; bathe, pat yourself dry, and then apply a very generous amount of moisturizer to the skin. For added benefit, soak oatmeal in a clean cloth bag in your bath to soothe your skin.
  • People suffering from the itchiness of eczema tend to have more anxiety, and feel more stressed out. Finding an outlet for your stress and keeping your anxiety at a manageable level will help to benefit your outlook and the severity of your eczema. A naturopathic doctor has many tools to address high stress and anxiety.

 

What are natural topical remedies for Eczema?

  • Seabuckthorn oil, castor oil, olive oil, coconut oil, calendula oil, chickweed cream, and moisturizers containing beeswax can all help to moisturize the skin and maintain its barrier. It is also important to use a mild pH-neutral soap free of any perfumes or fragrances to avoid any unwanted skin irritation.

 

What Supplements are good for Eczema?

  • Daily fish oil supplementation and use of the probiotic strains lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidobacterium bifidum are two supplements with good evidence for use in eczema.
  • However, you should always consult your doctor before starting any new medication or supplement. A naturopathic doctor will take a thorough health history to determine any other health concerns that should be addressed along with your skin health and come up with a comprehensive treatment plan. It is not uncommon for people with eczema to also experience digestive issues, allergic rhinitis (seasonal allergies), and asthma.

 

References:

 

Kido M., Tanaka J., Aoki N., et al: Helicobacter pylori promotes the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin by gastric epithelial cells and induces dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory Th2 responses. Infect Immun 2010 Jan; 78: pp. 108-114

 

Elias P.M., and Schmuth M.: Abnormal skin barrier in the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2009 Oct; 9: pp. 437-446

 

de Maat-Bleeker F., and Bruijnzeel-Koomen C.: Food allergy in adults with atopic dermatitis. Monogr Allergy 1996; 32: pp. 157-163

 

Agata H., Kondo N., Fukutomi O., et al: Effect of elimination on food-specific IgE antibodies and lymphocyte proliferative responses to food antigens in atopic dermatitis patients exhibiting sensitivity to food allergens. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1993; 91: pp. 668-679

 

Kremmyda L.S., Vlachava M., Noakes P.S., et al: Atopy risk in infants and children in relation to early exposure to fish, oily fish, or long-chain omega-3 fatty acids: a systematic review. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2011 Aug; 41: pp. 36-66

 

Barnes B.: Thyroid therapy in dermatology. Cutis 1971; 8: pp. 581-583

 

Maintz, L., et al. “Evidence for a reduced histamine degradation capacity in a subgroup of patients with atopic eczema.” The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Vol. 117, No. 5 (2006): 1106–1112.

 

Worm, M., et al. “Exogenous histamine aggravates eczema in a subgroup of patients with atopic dermatitis.” Acta Dermato-Venereologica. Vol. 89, No. 1 (2009): 52–56.

 

Chronic Prostatitis: When antibiotics and pain meds aren’t enough

Chronic Prostatitis Dr. Eric Viegas Naturopathic Medicine Ottawa

Chronic Prostatitis: When antibiotics and pain meds aren’t enough

 

Dr. Eric Viegas, ND

 

Chronic Prostatitis is an inflammation of the prostate gland and commonly affects young males who have had a previous viral or bacterial infection. It is estimated that about half of all males will be diagnosed with some form of prostatitis during their lifetime. About 90% of these men fall into the category of chronic prostatitis (CP). CP can be caused by a history of sexually transmitted infections and E. Coli, but also occurs without the presence of bacteria or viruses. The most commonly reported symptom in CP is continuous or spasmodic pain that is described as “dull” or “aching”. Pain occurs either in the perineum, penis, scrotum, or low back. Urological issues like incomplete emptying of your bladder, obstructed flow, pain on urination & ejaculation, and sexual dysfunction add to what is usually an already high level of psychological stress.

 

Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CnbP), CP without the presence of an infection, is a multifactorial condition; psychological stress, lack of physical activity, food sensitivity, allergies, autoimmunity, and neuromuscular dysfunction are theories of possible triggers in the development of CnbP. After a thorough assessment to rule out other possible diseases, doctors will often prescribe antibiotic and pain relief therapy. Unfortunately, non-bacterial prostatitis has a tendency to recur after antibiotic therapy, and pain medications carry risks of gastrointestinal bleeding if used long-term.

 

Interstitial Cystitis (IC) shares symptom overlap with CPPS. People with IC develop pain, irritation, and urinary problems without the presence of an infection. Unfortunately, both IC and CPPS are treated with antibiotics for symptom relief, but antibiotics are not recommended as a primary therapy; nor should they be used if a person has failed to respond to antibiotics in the past. Men diagnosed with CP and CnbP may have IC; in which case, they fall into the category of Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS).

 

Quercetin, a bioflavonoid I mentioned in my seasonal allergies post, is an excellent anti-inflammatory nutrient and mast cell inhibitor. Mast cells release histamine in your body, and have been found in high concentrations in the bladders of people with IC. A combination of quercetin, nettle root, pygeum, and curcumin may benefit people who suffer from IC and CP. A quality of life increase, and a decrease in symptoms of CP were reported by men with CPPS after a month long trial of Nettle, Pygeum, Curcumin, and Quercetin with antibiotics. Cernilton, a blend of rye pollens, has been used in the past to successfully treat urinary problems in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); an enlargement of the prostate. BPH is similar to CP in that there is usually obstructive and inflammatory problems in the prostate and urinary ducts. Cernilton may benefit men who suffer from CPPS and CP by improving urinary symptoms, pain, and quality of life. A healthy inner bladder wall is lined by a protective substance known as glycosaminoglycans. The use of the glycosaminoglycans glucosamine, chondroitin, and sodium hyaluronate may help with symptoms of IC.

 

Men with CPPS do not have to suffer in silence. There are alternatives to commonly prescribed medications that can significantly improve urinary symptoms and quality of life. For more information on which nutrients and therapies are right for you, speak to your naturopathic doctor.

 

References:

  1. McGowan C., Krieger J. Prostatitis, Epididymitis, and Orchitis. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett’s Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases 2015; Updated Edition 112: 1381-1387.
  2. Matsui, Hirofumi et al. “The Pathophysiology of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug (NSAID)-Induced Mucosal Injuries in Stomach and Small Intestine.” Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition 48.2 (2011): 107–111.
  3. Forrest JB, Schmidt S. Interstitial cystitis, chronic nonbacterial prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome in men: a common and frequently identical clinical entity. J Urol. 2004;172(6, pt 2):2561-2562.
  4. Katske F., Shoskes DA., Sender M., et al. Treatment of interstitial cystitis with a quercetin supplement. Tech Urol 2001; 7: 44-46.
  5. Cai T, Mazzoli S, Bechi A, Addonisio P, Mondaini N, Pagliai RC, Bartoletti R. Serenoa repens associated with Urtica dioica (ProstaMEV) and curcumin and quercitin (FlogMEV) extracts are able to improve the efficacy of prulifloxacin in bacterial prostatitis patients: results from a prospective randomised study. Int J Antimicrob Agents 2009; 33(6):549-53.
  6. MacDonald R1, Ishani A, Rutks I, Wilt TJ. A systematic review of Cernilton for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. BJU Int. 2000; 85(7):836-41.
  7. Wagenlehner FM1, Schneider H, Ludwig M, Schnitker J, Brähler E, Weidner W. A pollen extract (Cernilton) in patients with inflammatory chronic prostatitis-chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a multicentre, randomised, prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 study. Eur Urol. 2009 Sep; 56(3): 544-551.
  8. Theoharides TC. Treatment approaches for painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Drugs 2007; 67: 215-235.

Interstitial Cystitis: Some Ways to Relieve Urinary Pain and Anxiety

Interstitial Cystitis Dr. Eric Viegas Naturopathic Medicine Ottawa

Interstitial Cystitis: Some Ways to Relieve Urinary Pain and Anxiety

 

Dr. Eric Viegas, ND

 

Interstitial Cystitis (IC) is an inflammatory condition of the urological system, particularly the bladder wall, and is thought to affect more women than men. Age of onset can be anywhere from childhood to middle-age, and a majority of people with IC are caucasian. As mentioned in my chronic prostatitis blogpost, men are often overlooked when it comes to IC, since most doctors assume it is a primarily female condition. Your doctor should perform a thorough work up to determine if your urinary condition is the result of prostate issues, IC, or other factors. Strangely, the urinary frequency, urgency, and pelvic pain common in IC often occur in the absence of any traceable infections or blood in the urine.

 

Pain flare ups of IC occur at the beginning of a woman’s period, and/or after sexual intercourse. People with IC may experience pain in the bladder, pelvis, vagina, tip of the penis, low back, and lower abdomen. IC can significantly compromise quality of life; people worry about getting to the bathroom on time and a normal everyday commute to work can be extremely panic-inducing. Psychological distress is a key factor in the worsening of anxiety and depression in people with IC.

 

There are two types of IC: classic or ulcerative IC, and non-ulcerative IC. In classic IC, the bladder develops patches of inflammation leading to ulcers and scarring. Overtime, classic IC causes reduction in bladder capacity. In non-ulcerative IC, there are no obvious physical changes to suggest pathology of the bladder wall. Unfortunately, little is currently known about how people develop non-ulcerative IC, and some people are mistakenly treated for chronic urinary tract infection (UTI) with antibiotics.

 

Some conditions associated with IC include irritable bowel syndrome, endometriosis, allergies, fibromyalgia and mood disorders.

 

Strenuous exercise, prolonged sitting, allergies, and certain foods can aggravate IC. Acidic foods like beer, tomatoes, chocolate, and coffee can aggravate symptoms of IC, so the first step in improving IC is to identify and eliminate these foods.

 

Some other foods that have been linked to a worsening of IC symptoms:

  • Lima beans, Lentils
  • Avocados
  • Peaches
  • Spicy Foods
  • Plums
  • Gluten
  • Grapefruit, Oranges, Lemons etc
  • Dairy
  • Pineapple
  • Raisins, Prunes

 

Demulcents are substances that can repair and soothe inflamed or irritated internal tissues. In IC, an irritated and inflamed bladder wall is the main culprit behind urinary frequency, urgency and pain. Your naturopathic doctor (ND) has access to a variety of botanical demulcents that can be combined in a daily drink to combat urological inflammation. Your ND can also add botanical medicines or nutritional supplements to combat anxiety and depression, to make your stress response more manageable, and improve your quality of life.

 

Quercetin–a bioflavonoid discussed at length in both my posts on allergies, and prostatitis—is a nutritional supplement that can stop the activation of mast cells in an allergic response and protect the bladder wall by reducing inflammation. The use of Vitamin A has been shown to inhibit mast cell activation, and protect mucosal surfaces from irritation and inflammation. Glucosamine, a member of the glycosaminoglycan family, can repair the bladder wall and allow for a more comfortable passing of urine.  

 

Naturopathic medicine offers a comprehensive treatment plan for IC. With dietary and lifestyle factors taken care of, NDs can use a variety of botanical medicines and nutritional supplements to decrease the severity of symptoms and improve quality of life for people with IC. There are many ways to find relief. Speak to your ND today!

 

References:

 

Espinosa G, Murray MT. Cystitis and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. Textbook of Natural Medicine; 159: 1308-1317.

 

Ching C. Interstitial cystitis. First Consult 2012.

 

Abascal K, Yarnell E. Alternative and Complementary Therapies. April 2008, 14(2): 69-77. doi:10.1089/act.2008.14203.

 

Yarnell E. Alternative and Complementary Therapies. February 2009, 3(4): 269-275. doi:10.1089/act.1997.3.269.

 

Hudson T. Alternative and Complementary Therapies. July 2004, 7(2): 88-90. doi:10.1089/10762800151125074.

 

Hudson T. “Interstitial Cystitis: A New Approach.” Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients, Feb. 2001, p. 172. Academic OneFile, Accessed 19 May 2017.

 

Dunlap C, et al. An integrative approach to interstitial cystitis. Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing 2013; (9)1: 48 – 52.

 

Insomnia: When Counting Sheep Won’t Help Ewe

Insomnia Dr. Eric Viegas Naturopathic Medicine Ottawa

Insomnia: When Counting Sheep Won’t Help Ewe

Dr. Eric Viegas, ND

 

If you have chronic trouble sleeping then chances are you are one of the estimated 3.3 million Canadians struggling with insomnia. ‘Insomnia’ refers to the disruption of: time taken to fall asleep, amount of time asleep (versus time in bed) through the night, waking up too early, and feeling unrefreshed on waking.1 Insomnia is extremely frustrating, and can be a fearful prospect knowing that it can lead to impaired memory and concentration.1 As a result, insomnia can predispose you to be more accident prone at home, on the road, and in the workplace.1 Insomnia exists as its own disorder, but it is also associated with a large number of physical and mental illnesses. For example, mood disorders like depression and anxiety are both associated with insomnia.1

 

So what can be done to help you get a better night’s sleep? First, it is important to identify the underlying cause of your insomnia. If you are sensitive to light and noise, make sure your bedroom is as dark as possible and remove any electronics that might be distracting you from falling asleep. The ‘blue light’ emitted from our TVs, laptops, and mobile phones all effect the release of melatonin from our brains.2 A small amount of melatonin, one of the most well known natural sleep aids, is secreted by your pineal during the day. At night, melatonin secretion spikes to help us get to sleep. Exposure to ‘blue light’ before bed suppresses melatonin secretion and tricks our bodies into thinking we should be awake.2 If you are not willing to give up your bedtime electronics, you can reduce ‘blue light’ exposure by turning down the brightness of the device, and/or downloading an app (eg. Twilight). The long term use of benzodiazepine medication for anxiety and panic disorders can deplete the brain’s supply of melatonin.3 Overtime, a disruption in circadian rhythm reduces normal sleeping habits. Melatonin supplementation can help with normalizing circadian rhythm, and alleviating withdrawal symptoms from anti-anxiety meds.3 Insomnia, fatigue, ADHD, IBS, and breast cancer risk, are all associated with melatonin deficiency.3 Symptoms of fibromyalgia, bulimia, neuralgia, certain forms of depression, and certain postmenopausal problems improve with melatonin supplementation.3 Other common underlying causes of insomnia include mood disorders, hormone imbalance, sleep apnea, chronic pain, and exercising too close to bedtime.

 

The need to be busy has has left us overworked and overtired. When our bodies are in a constant state of stress, our systems shift from ‘rest and digest’ to ‘fight or flight?’. As a consequence, our adrenal glands secrete more cortisol; a hormone responsible for increasing blood sugar, and the breakdown of fat & muscle, for the energy to get us away from danger. Cortisol spikes in the morning to get us out of bed, and is very low at night to help us fall asleep. In a chronically stressed state, high cortisol will worsen insomnia and–if left untreated–will eventually lead to adrenal fatigue. Speak to your naturopathic doctor about your health concerns to help determine the underlying cause(s) and help tailor a treatment plan specific to your individual needs. Acupuncture, nutritional changes through diet and supplements, counselling, and sleep hygiene advice are all parts of naturopathic treatment that can help get you back to sleep and leave you feeling well rested.

 

References:

 

  1. Tjepkema M. “Insomnia”. Statistics Canada Health Reports. 2005 17(1): 9-25.
  2. 2. Schmerler, Jessica. “Q&A Why is Blue Light Before Bed Bad For Sleep?” Scientific American. Nature America, September 2015.
  3. Rohr UD, Herold J. “Melatonin deficiencies in women.” Maturitas. 2002 Apr 15(41): 85-10.